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▷▷ 2021 ▷ The history of the Mongolian motorcycle club

5 julio, 2021


The Mongols Motorcycle Club was formed in California in the late 1960s. At that time, the name “One Percent Clubs” had not yet been coined, meaning 1% of the clubs operating outside of the law-abiding forms of the American Motorcycle Club. Thanks to the activities of the Mongols, he would soon do so (although, to be fair, the actions of some other clubs like the Hells Angels and the Outlaws should take some of the credit as well). Big, bad, and dangerous to meet, Mongols are exactly the kind of guy your mother warned you about. If you’ve ever wondered about the origins of one of America’s most notorious motorcycle clubs, here is what you need to know about the Mongols Motorcycle Club.

The birth of the motorcycle club

Regardless of your colors, your patch, your motorcycle preferences or your choice of activities, all motorcycle clubs, from Mongolians to Pagans, the Iron Order Motorcycle Club to the Christian Motorcycle Association, have their foundations. in the same place: the original. MC, the motorcycle club. The Motorcycle Club was founded in London in 1901. At that time, the motorcycle had just been born, which shows that, as motorbikeonly.com points out, as long as there are motorized two-wheelers on the roads, there have been people who want to associate with the unique sense of camaraderie they offer. In 1903, the first MC was established in the USA: The Yonkers Motorcycle Club. Initially, both he and all the other clubs that began to spring up across the country were harmless.

They provided an opportunity for motorcycle enthusiasts to socialize, meet and compete. There was nothing sinister about their activities, and no law-abiding citizen had to fear if a group of club members came to town. Things started to change at the end of the Second World War. Although the focus of the clubs was still on racing, a new form of rebellion began to appear. In 1948, the Hells Angels were formed. Made up of a vast majority of ex-military men who had served in the war, the Hells Angels quickly began to gain reputations… for all the wrong reasons. The trend of new rebellious motorcycle clubs started by returning military personnel continued with both the Korean War and the Vietnam War. In fact, it was the Vietnam War that gave us one of the most notorious clubs, the Mongols Motorcycle Club.

The early days of the Mongolian motorcycle club

In the late 1960s, a group of servicemen returning from the Vietnam War tried to join the Hells Angels. After being rejected due to their Hispanic heritage, they decided to take matters into their own hands and form their own club. On December 5, 1969, the Mongols Motorcycle Club was founded in Montebello, California. According to mongolsmc.com, the Mongols were inspired for their name by the Mongol Empire which was led by Genghis Khan. Highly disciplined, skillfully tactical, and well-coordinated, these intrepid (and feared) horsemen conquered Eurasia in the early 13th century. Despite their small numbers, they made their way through their enemies, something to which the Mongols have paid tribute with their motto “Quantity, not quality.”

Loyalty, honor, and respect among members were an integral part of the club’s initial vision. Backed by a specific attitude, culture and lifestyle, the club quickly began to earn a reputation, although by today’s standards it would be considered tame. The Vietnam veterans who made up the majority of their ranks quickly turned the Mongols from a motley collection of horsemen into a well-organized unit with the same regimented nature and discipline that they had experienced in Vietnam. Within five years of its inception, chapters had sprung up in Los Angeles, San Diego, Bakersfield, Long Beach, San Gabriel Valley, and San Fernando Valley. As their ranks grew, so did their notoriety. When the AMC finally came up with the phrase “one percent club” in the early 1970s, the Mongols were definitely one of them.

The growth of the Mongols

The Mongols Motorcycle Club was formed in Southern California, and today the West Coast remains the club’s stronghold. However, it has also made some progress domestically and abroad. It currently has 14 chapters in the US and a presence in 10 countries internationally. Current estimates put their ranks at around 2,000 fully-patched members. As hotcars.com points out, despite its growth, …



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