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How does each platform and social network measure their video views?

27 mayo, 2021

We all like to make comparisons, and if we like to upload videos to social networks or work in marketing, surely more than once we have stopped to see how many views we get on YouTube, Facebook or Snapchat. But something we must keep in mind is that each platform measure visualizations based on different parameters.

So that the next time you are going to analyze and compare how a video has behaved on different social networks, today we are going to show you from how long to play consider each one that we have had a visualization, and also what are the tricks of each one to make this number grow.

Because of course, when we talk about a visualization we think of it as every time a person watches a video. But a video that is seen by mistake is worth the same and the one that is deliberately seen? Well, it depends on the platform, because we have them from those that count a visualization as a reproduction of more than 3 seconds to those that do not until we are at least 30 watching a video.

From VHS to STREAMING everywhere

From when is it considered reproduction?

Platform

What is a visualization?

Facebook

3 seconds

Instagram

3 seconds

Snapchat

1 second

Tumblr

N / A

Twitch

Loading

Twitter

3 seconds

Vidme

3 seconds

Vimeo

By clicking

Came

Full display

Youtube

≈30 seconds

Based on data from Marketing Land, and reviewing the work that several tweeters have continued to do in a public Doc in which they have collected information published by Steam Hatchet for Twitch, Delmondo on Analytics, Vimeo or AdvertisingAge on Tumblr, we have been able to put it all together to create this chart.

In it we see that Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and Vidme count a reproduction as a display after three seconds. This leaves out those who mistakenly give them to play a video, but not those to whom it is automatically opened while they are viewing their timeline.

YouTube seems to take it a little more seriously, and with its 30-second window it is more possible than the views that it counts. they are really from people who have been watching the video at least for a little while. I came instead is the most realistic since it only counts real reproductions, although of course, with 6-second videos this is something easy to do.

At the other end of the scale we have Twitch and Vimeo, the first counts as a view to anyone who opens the video, and the second at the moment we click on it to play it. In both cases, the metrics will be of little use for those who want to know how many people have been watching their material, since you will add them to those who have entered by mistake.

And finally we have Tumblr, which is the least transparent platform to not providing specific information on how it is accounted for. Although of course, as we will see later, its users are not going to know how many people see them.

What elements does each platform offer?

Service

View Counter (Public)

View counter (owner)

Self-reproduction

Auto-loop

Default audio

Embeddable

API access

Facebook

Yes

Yes

Yes

Not

Switched off

Yes

Only owners

Instagram

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Switched off

Yes

Advertisers only

Snapchat

Not

Yes

Not

Not

Switched on

Not

Not

Tumblr

Not

Advertisers only

Yes

Yes

Switched off

Yes

Not

Twitch

Yes

Yes

Yes

Not

Switched on

Yes

Yes

Twitter

Not

Yes

Yes

Not

Switched off

Yes

Advertisers only

Vidme

Yes

Yes

Yes

Not

Switched on

Yes

Yes

Vimeo

Yes

Yes

N / A

Not

Switched on

Yes

Yes

Came

Yes

Yes

N / A

Yes

Switched on

Yes

Not

Youtube

Yes

Yes

N / A

Not

Switched on

Yes

Yes

Using the metrics offered by the same pages as before we have also been able to create this other table. In it we can see what elements each platform offers, from view counters to the possibility of embedding the videos on a website. We also see the characteristics of the videos, if they auto-reproduce, allow or if they enable audio by default.

We can see for example that except Snapchat, Tumblr and Twitter all other platforms offer public statistics so that anyone can see the number of views of each video. Likewise, all but Tumblr are offered privately to account owners. Tumblr actually only shows the number of views to advertisers.

For its part, all social networks except Snapchat auto-play the videos when we go through them, a good way to increase the number of reproductions. Facebook, Instagram, Tumblr and Twitter, we assume that in order not to disturb when we go through a video, it makes yours start playing without sound.

We therefore see a combination that, together with the little time that passes to count a visit as a visualization, causes a push to be taken into account in the statistics. We may be reading a friend’s post, and being silenced we don’t even realize that a video is being displayed above or below. But whether we are paying attention to it or not, after a few seconds it will be counted as a visualization.

With the exception of Snapchat, something evident considering that it is sold as a network where the content is private, the rest of the platforms offer the Embed option to be able to embed videos in blogs and web pages. Something quite useful to allow our content to surf the net and get some valuable extra views.

As for the openness to developers, this is not too much in most cases. Only YouTube, Vimeo, Vidme and Twitch give free access to the APIWhile Facebook and Twitter reserve it for users only, and Instagram only offers it to advertisers.

Therefore, from now on we will have to take all this into account when interpreting the statistics of our videos on the different platforms. Each of them uses different parameters, which, as we have seen, means that, for example, a visualization on Facebook and Twitter does not have the same value as on YouTube as it is easier to achieve.

Image | Efraimstochter
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